JoshBlogs is moving on up to JoshBlackman.com – Update your Bookmarks and RSS Feeds

I launched this blog about 2 months ago. 45,000 visitors, 414 posts, 402 comments, and one really cool license plate later, I’m moving on up.

www.JoshBlackman.com is born.

Please update to the new RSS Feed feed://joshblackman.com/blog/?feed=rss2 and subscribe to my iTunes Feed

I will no longer update JoshBlogs, and I have transferred all of the old posts to JoshBlackman.com, so my loyal readers will not miss a thing.

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FantasySCOTUS.net Update: Leagues are Now Live! Join and Create your Own Leagues!

By popular demand, I have added Leagues to FantasySCOTUS.net. I have already added the top 100 Schools, based on the US News & World Reports, but you can create your own leagues. Just log in, and click the Leagues link, and then Join or Create a league!

Also in the works are a League Scoreboard feature, A Cert or No Cert Game (the winner will receive the Certiorari Crystal Ball Award), a forum, and some other cool stuff.

And this morning at 10 a.m., Predictions of the 10th Justice will be premiering at www.AboveTheLaw.com.

FantasySCOTUS.net Predictions of the 10th Justice: Citizens United v. FEC (Hilary Movie Case)

Welcome to the first installment of Predictions of the 10th Justice, brought to you by FantasySCOTUS.net. FantasySCOTUS.net, the premier Supreme Court fantasy league, has over 1,300 members, who have made predictions on all cases currently pending before the Supreme Court. In this feature, we analyze these predictions, and try to explain how the Supreme Court will resolve top cases.

The first case we will look at is Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, commonly known as the Hillary Movie case.

Citizens United Overall Predictions

Out of 286 predictions, 192 members (67%) predicted that the Supreme Court will likely reverse the lower court’s decision regarding the case, and 94 members (33%) predicted that the Court will affirm the lower court’s decisions. Next we will explore the decision vote distributions and how the Justices will vote.

Voting Distribution Frequencies

On this bar graph, the 9-0 and 8-1 Affirm splits each garnered less than 5 votes, along with 7-2, 8-1, and 9-0 Reverse. This graph reinforces the predicted outcome from the first chart.  Most members are predicting a 5-4 Reverse, while those predicting an Affirm were more moderately split,  slightly favoring a 5-4 split over a 6-3 split. Overall, the 10th Justice predicts a 5-4 decision reversing the lower courts holding.

But how will each Justice vote? Predictions, after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »

FantasySCOTUS.net on Underneath Their Robes’s Holiday Wish List

It’s never too early to start looking for Festivus gifts. Underneath Their Robes has a fantastic suggestion:

Given today’s economy and the current reluctance of many to spend their hard-earned/non-existent bonuses on luxury goods, Clerquette suggests this stocking-stuffer for the sports fan-Groupie on your list: a membership in FantasySCOTUS.net, the newly minted Supreme Court Fantasy League. Recent law-school grad and self-described “big Supreme Court nerd” Josh Blackman created the site so that Groupies like you — like us, dear readers — can “play like the Tenth Justice.”  The Rules, Blackman explains, are “simple.”

In true appellate fashion, memberships fees are three-tiered; they range from free (for students and the unemployed) to $10. If you’re a betting man, woman, or Groupie, Clerquette says: Christmas has come early this year! Indulge! If you’re searching for a gift that will keep on giving — at least from October to late June/early July — look no further! FantasySCOTUS.net will keep your favorite groupie busy, away from productive activity, and unable to engage in telephone conversations while formulating bets for months to come. Hey: at least there’s no draft.
With 1,200 members and counting, this is a perfect stocking stuffer!
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FantasySCOTUS.net. The 10th Justice Predicts the Court Will Reverse Citizens United v. FEC 5-4 (Hilary Movie Case). But how will Kennedy vote?

Welcome to the first installment of Predictions of the  10th Justice, brought to you by FantasySCOTUS.net. FantasySCOTUS.net, the Premier Supreme Court Fantasy League, has over 1,300 members, who have made predictions on all cases currently pending before the Supreme Court. In this feature, we analyze these predictions, and try to explain how the Supreme Court will resolve top cases.

The first case we will look at is Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, commonly known as the Hillary Movie case.

Citizens United Overall Predictions

Out of 286 predictions, 192 members (67%) held that the Supreme Court will likely reverse the lower court’s decision regarding the case, and 94 members  (33%) held that the Court will affirm the lower court’s decisions. Next we will explore how the decision vote distributions and how the Justices will vote.


Voting Distribution Frequencies

On this bar graph, the 9-0 and 8-1 Affirm splits each garnered less than 5 votes, along with 7-2, 8-1, and 9-0 Reverse. This graph reinforces the predicted outcome from the first chart.  Most members are predicting a 5-4 Reverse, while those predicting an Affirm were more moderately split,  slightly favored a 5-4 splitover a 6-3 split. Overall, the 10th Justice predicts a 5-4 decision reversing the lower courts holding.

But how will each Justice vote? Predictions, after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »

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FantasySCOTUS.net: 1,000 Members, Professor’s Discount

To date, about 1,000 people have signed up.

Professors can now take advantage of the discounted $5 signup fee. Enjoy.

I am making several big changes (like developing Leagues and some other cool stuff). Stay tuned, and tell your friends.

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My interview about FantasySCOTUS.net featured on Wall Street Journal Law Blog

I had the pleasure of chatting with Ashby Jones of the Wall Street Journal Law Blog, and he wrote a pretty good feature about FantasySCOTUS.net. Check out the interview here.

The old saw goes like this: that lawyers are not risk-takers. That’s part of the reason, we suspect that, David Boies aside, we don’t hear too many tales of BigLaw lawyers ripping it up on the craps tables in Vegas.

But now, at long last, a little gambling operation that gives lawyers — or at least those who follow the Supreme Court — a leg up on all others. It’s, yes, FantasyScotus.net, the self-proclaimed premier Supreme Court fantasy league (and it might be the only, as far as we can tell).

Click here to check it out. The idea behind the site, which is the brainchild of recent George Mason law grad Josh Blackman, is simple: you pick the way you think the Supreme Court will rule on its docket. You’re awarded points for picking the outcome of the case (whether the court affirms or reverses the lower court); the split (9-0, 8-1, 7-2, 6-3, 5-4, 4-1-4, or fragmented); as well as the justices in the majority and the justices in the dissent. It’s $5 or $10 to join, but the fee is waived for students, law clerks and unemployed attorneys.

At the end of the term, all the points accumulated will be tallied, and a winner decreed.

Blackman, currently clerking in the Western District of Pennsylvania, says he thought of the idea in September, shortly after the Citizens United arguments. Says Blackman: “I thought, ‘what if Vegas handicapped this case? What would the odds be?’ I took the thought and ran with it.”

Blackman says his the fees will largely go to cover his costs, and that the point is not to make money. “That’s not at all why I’m doing it,” he says. “I think it’s just cool and gives some variety to my life.”

And what’s the prize? It’s not going to be cash. “I don’t think lawyers would be incentivized by cash. It’s going to be something else, like a golden gavel, maybe one of those Supreme Court bobbleheads.”

We have no idea, LBers, if this idea is going to flop or take off. But it sounded sorta fun to us. If you wind up giving it a whirl, and loving or loathing, let us hear about it.

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